Mai Kinohi Mai

Surfing in Hawai‘i

December 14, 2019 – October 25, 2020

Mai Kinohi Mai

Surfing in Hawai‘i

December 14, 2019 – October 25, 2020

Surfing is a culture, an art, a science, and a way of life. Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawaii is an original exhibit featuring unique treasures from the Museum’s collection of surfing materials and archival surfing photographs. Mai Kinohi Mai (“from the beginning”) offers the greatest assemblage of storied surfboards ever, both from our collection and on loan, spanning surfing’s early history to the present day.

On View

Museum Hours

Open Every Day
9 am – 5 pm

Ages

All Ages

Location

Castle Memorial Building

Admission

Adults: $24.95
Seniors (65+): $21.95
Youth (4–17): $16.95
Children (3 and under): Free
Children age 16 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.

Exhibit Tours

Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, & Sundays at 2 p.m.
Free with Museum Admission
A very early photo of two surfers at Waikīkī, from about 1895. (Bishop Museum Archives)
John John Florence at the 2013 Eddie Invitational, holding the board he would win the contest with in 2016. The board will be on display at Bishop Museum during the run of the exhibit. (Right Frame Photography)
Duke Kahanamoku and the massive hollow board he built for himself at Waikiki, ca. 1935. (Tai Sing Loo, Bishop Museum Archives)
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A very early photo of two surfers at Waikīkī, from about 1895. (Bishop Museum Archives)
John John Florence at the 2013 Eddie Invitational, holding the board he would win the contest with in 2016. The board will be on display at Bishop Museum during the run of the exhibit. (Right Frame Photography)
Duke Kahanamoku and the massive hollow board he built for himself at Waikiki, ca. 1935. (Tai Sing Loo, Bishop Museum Archives)
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With the advantages of Hawai‘i’s shoreline topography, warm ocean waters, and abundant waves, the indigenous people of the Hawaiian Islands developed and refined the sport that has become a thriving international phenomenon today.
 
Within the gallery experience, be awestruck by the variety of boards on view from all eras of the sport, including the oldest known traditional surfboards, and examples of boards owned or ridden by surf legends such as Duke Kahanamoku and Rell Sunn, the “Queen of Mākaha.” Continue through the gallery to an enormous room lined with projection screens, and be immersed in surf videos dating from the early-twentieth century to today. So realistic are these videos that you’ll almost seem to be in the water, rushing down the face of a wave. If this isn’t thrilling enough, the “Surf-O-Lator” allows you to ride a digital wave! Then discover the science behind catching the perfect swell with interactive touchscreens. Finally, stop by surfboard maker Pohaku Stone’s workshop and see firsthand how traditional-style boards are made.
 
Young or old, surf novice or expert, come find a bit of the surfer in you—at Bishop Museum.

Mai Kinohi Mai: Surfing in Hawai‘i Art Installations

“Plastic Free Pipeline”

Ethan Estess, 2019

About the Artwork:​

Plastic Free Pipeline is an interactive art installation created from marine debris by artist/ocean scientist Ethan Estess to highlight the impact plastic pollution has on ocean ecosystems. The commercial fishing rope and plastic objects were collected off the beaches of Oahu by volunteers with Sustainable Coastlines Hawaii, and the wood for the structure was sourced from Reuse Hawaii- a reclaimed lumber yard in Honolulu. Local youths helped to untangle the fishing rope and participated in a beach cleanup at the Plastic Free Hawaii Youth Summit organized by the Kokua Hawaii Foundation. This sculpture will continue to travel around the islands to raise awareness and inspire people to Refuse, Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle plastics.

“Delivery”

Kris Goto, 2019

About the Artwork:

“This mural is about three girls who are on their journey to make their next delivery of reusable items.  They work very hard day and night for the better living environment for their friends that live under the sea and also plant taro along the way!”

About the Artist: Kris Goto is a Honolulu based artist who was born in Kagoshima, Japan. She spent her school years in Hong Kong and New Zealand before moving to O’ahu in 2006. Her detailed linework explores the local lifestyle of Hawai’i through a whimsical, humorous and surrealistic perspective. She caught her first wave in 2009 and plan on working on her friendship with the waves into the future.

This exhibition is generously supported by:

Contributing Sponsors
First Insurance Company of Hawaii
Subaru Hawaii
Tommy Holmes Foundation

Media Sponsor
Surf News Network

Hospitality Sponsor
Outrigger Hotels & Resorts

Cover image:

A colorful advertising booklet from the late 1920s promotes travel to Hawai‘i via the Los Angeles Steamship Company. (Private collection)

Duke Kahanamoku and the massive hollow board he built for himself at Waikīkī in about 1935. (Tai Sing Loo, Bishop Museum Archives)

A 1960s decal from the time of the surfing craze in the USA. (Private collection)