Field Trip Culture Programs and Tours 2017-08-10T10:55:34+00:00

Culture Programs

 

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Culture Program Options

When choosing culture programs for your Bishop Museum Introductory Experience PLUS there are two options: programs and tours. Each program or tour is $1 per student.

Hawaiian Hall Complex Programs

Join us for a 30-minute interactive, hands-on experience based around the Bishop Museum’s cultural collections.  These Culture Education programs represent a wide variety of topics, focused around Hawaiian and Pacific Islands culture. Whether in the Atrium or the native plant garden, students can learn about aspects of island life such as traditional song and dance, food gathering, voyaging, and more! Programs are led by Culture Education staff and trained docent volunteers as students explore, learn, and share about island cultures.

I LUNA, I LALO: Animals Of Our Islands

What flies in the sky? What swims in the sea? Through sight, touch, and interactive activities, this hands-on program will introduce students to some of the amazing birds, fish and other animals that we find here in Hawaiʻi.

AHUPUA’A:  Resources and Community

How do we live together on an island?  Will we have all the things we need?  Learn about the traditional Hawaiian system of land division, and how we can share resources from mauka to makai.  Working together in an imaginative activity, students will explore the traditional Hawaiian tools that help us meet our basic human needs as individuals and as a community.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.3.3.1      Analyze issues and concerns of own community and those of a similar community in the past
SS.3.7.4     Examine the ways in which people modify the physical environment and the effects of these changes
SS.3.8.2     Explain that goods and resources are limited because there are not enough natural, human, and capital resources to satisfy everyone’s wants
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.3.2     Explain the history of Hawaii’s early economy
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.6.2     Describe how individuals or groups deal with conflict, cooperation, and interdependence within the ahupua’a
SS.4.8.1     Describe the economic interdependence among those living in the ahupua’a

HOLOHOLO:  Transportation and Voyaging

How do we travel across land and sea?  Explore different styles of travel in Hawai’i and the Pacific.  Our journey will take us through historic voyaging periods up to the present day voyaging movement.  Students will work together as a team of “canoe builders” to construct a model wa’a, and imagine life as a crew of ocean travelers.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.3.3.1      Analyze issues and concerns of own community and those of a similar community in the past
SS.3.7.5     Examine the economic and geographic factors that influence why people migrate and where they settle
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.3.4     Describe the theories of early migrations from parts of Polynesia to Hawai’i, including migration myths and legends
SS.4.3.5     Identify reasons that early explorers, settlers, and immigrants came to Hawai’i (including the influence of Pa’ao) or the Polynesian region and describe what their lives and experiences were like
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawai’i
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

MELE:  Music and Dance

Let’s sing and dance!  In this joyful interactive program, students will hear the sounds of traditional Hawaiian instruments.  Together, students will have a chance to learn a short hula, and explore the relationships among hula instruments, expressive rhythmic body movement, and storytelling.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
FA.3.2.10     Perform songs from various cultures within their cultural context
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
FA.4.1.4     Explain how art reflects life, culture, attitudes, and beliefs of the artist
FA.4.4.4     Describe how the dances of Hawai’i reflect the Hawaiian history and culture

PĀ’ANI:  Sports and Games

Let’s have some fun!  Students will learn about traditional Hawaiian games, like hu (spinning tops) and nane (riddles).  Together, students will explore physical coordination, critical thinking and strategy, and team spirit.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

MAHI’AI:  Plants and Farming

Where does our food come from?  Students will grow their knowledge of Hawaiian and Pacific plants needed for food and medicine, as well as the tools and techniques of traditional island farming.  How well do you know Pacific food plants?  Discover the connections between the food we eat and the plants we grow.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.7.3     Analyze the consequences of human modification of the physical environment in Hawaii using geographic representations (including lo’i kalo and loko i’a)

LAWAI’A:  Fishing Tools and Practices 

What can the ocean provide?  Students will dive deep into traditional fishing practices in Hawai’i and the Pacific and explore the ways we get food and other resources from “nature’s icebox.”  Through this interactive program, students will imagine themselves as gatherers of the ocean’s bounty.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.7.3     Analyze the consequences of human modification of the physical environment in Hawaii using geographic representations (including lo’i kalo and loko i’a)

KAUHALE:  Shelter and Construction

Where is home?  Build your knowledge of traditional Hawaiian hale (house) construction and daily living.  In this hands-on program, students will explore traditional materials, tools, and practices needed to create both shelter and community.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawai’i
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

‘A’AHU:  Clothing and Adornments

How do we make the things we wear?  Clothing keeps our bodies protected, signifies our roles in society, and connects us to our island home.  Through multisensory exploration, students will learn about the materials and processes used to make kapa (barkcloth), featherwork, and some unique articles of Hawaiian clothing.

HCPS III – Benchmarks

SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.3.6.1     Explain that different cultures have unique values, beliefs, and practices
SS.3.6.2      Make informed judgments about cultures based on evidence from cultural artifacts
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
FA.4.1.4     Explain how art reflects life, culture, attitudes, and beliefs of the artist

AHUPUA’A:  Resources and Community

How do we live together on an island?  Will we have all the things we need?  Learn about the traditional Hawaiian system of land division, and how we can share resources from mauka to makai.  Working together in an imaginative activity, students will explore the traditional Hawaiian tools that help us meet our basic human needs as individuals and as a community.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.3.3.1      Analyze issues and concerns of own community and those of a similar community in the past
SS.3.7.4     Examine the ways in which people modify the physical environment and the effects of these changes
SS.3.8.2     Explain that goods and resources are limited because there are not enough natural, human, and capital resources to satisfy everyone’s wants
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.3.2     Explain the history of Hawaii’s early economy
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.6.2     Describe how individuals or groups deal with conflict, cooperation, and interdependence within the ahupua’a
SS.4.8.1     Describe the economic interdependence among those living in the ahupua’a

HOLOHOLO:  Transportation and Voyaging

How do we travel across land and sea?  Explore different styles of travel in Hawai’i and the Pacific.  Our journey will take us through historic voyaging periods up to the present day voyaging movement.  Students will work together as a team of “canoe builders” to construct a model wa’a, and imagine life as a crew of ocean travelers.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.3.3.1      Analyze issues and concerns of own community and those of a similar community in the past
SS.3.7.5     Examine the economic and geographic factors that influence why people migrate and where they settle
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.3.4     Describe the theories of early migrations from parts of Polynesia to Hawai’i, including migration myths and legends
SS.4.3.5     Identify reasons that early explorers, settlers, and immigrants came to Hawai’i (including the influence of Pa’ao) or the Polynesian region and describe what their lives and experiences were like
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawai’i
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

MELE:  Music and Dance

Let’s sing and dance!  In this joyful interactive program, students will hear the sounds of traditional Hawaiian instruments.  Together, students will have a chance to learn a short hula, and explore the relationships among hula instruments, expressive rhythmic body movement, and storytelling.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
FA.3.2.10     Perform songs from various cultures within their cultural context
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
FA.4.1.4     Explain how art reflects life, culture, attitudes, and beliefs of the artist
FA.4.4.4     Describe how the dances of Hawai’i reflect the Hawaiian history and culture

PĀ’ANI:  Sports and Games

Let’s have some fun!  Students will learn about traditional Hawaiian games, like hu (spinning tops) and nane (riddles).  Together, students will explore physical coordination, critical thinking and strategy, and team spirit.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

MAHI’AI:  Plants and Farming

Where does our food come from?  Students will grow their knowledge of Hawaiian and Pacific plants needed for food and medicine, as well as the tools and techniques of traditional island farming.  How well do you know Pacific food plants?  Discover the connections between the food we eat and the plants we grow.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.7.3     Analyze the consequences of human modification of the physical environment in Hawaii using geographic representations (including lo’i kalo and loko i’a)

LAWAI’A:  Fishing Tools and Practices 

What can the ocean provide?  Students will dive deep into traditional fishing practices in Hawai’i and the Pacific and explore the ways we get food and other resources from “nature’s icebox.”  Through this interactive program, students will imagine themselves as gatherers of the ocean’s bounty.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
SS.4.7.3     Analyze the consequences of human modification of the physical environment in Hawaii using geographic representations (including lo’i kalo and loko i’a)

KAUHALE:  Shelter and Construction

Where is home?  Build your knowledge of traditional Hawaiian hale (house) construction and daily living.  In this hands-on program, students will explore traditional materials, tools, and practices needed to create both shelter and community.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawai’i
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture

‘A’AHU:  Clothing and Adornments

How do we make the things we wear?  Clothing keeps our bodies protected, signifies our roles in society, and connects us to our island home.  Through multisensory exploration, students will learn about the materials and processes used to make kapa (barkcloth), featherwork, and some unique articles of Hawaiian clothing.

HCPS III – Benchmarks

SS.2.6.1      Describe ways in which own and other cultures express their cultural beliefs and practices through music and art
SS.3.6.1     Explain that different cultures have unique values, beliefs, and practices
SS.3.6.2      Make informed judgments about cultures based on evidence from cultural artifacts
SS.4.3.1    Explain the origins and culture of early Hawaiians
SS.4.5.1     Describe the roles, rights, and responsibilities of each class in pre-contact Hawaii
SS.4.6.1    Explain how language, traditional lore, music, dance, artifacts, traditional practices, beliefs, values, and behaviors are elements of culture and contribute to the preservation of culture
FA.4.1.4     Explain how art reflects life, culture, attitudes, and beliefs of the artist

HO’OLAHA:  Canoe Plants

What do we need to bring our new island home?  Expand your knowledge of the staple plants of the Pacific, particularly those needed to sustain a successful sea voyage and establish new island settlements.  This 30-minute program will include a garden tour designed to highlight the “canoe plants” introduced to Hawai’i by early Pacific voyagers, as well as creative hands-on activities for students. This program is part of our new Voyages of Discovery package but can also be booked as a standalone.

HO’OLAHA:  Canoe Plants

What do we need to bring our new island home?  Expand your knowledge of the staple plants of the Pacific, particularly those needed to sustain a successful sea voyage and establish new island settlements.  This 30-minute program will include a garden tour designed to highlight the “canoe plants” introduced to Hawai’i by early Pacific voyagers, as well as creative hands-on activities for students. This program is part of our new Voyages of Discovery package but can also be booked as a standalone.

Hawaiian Hall Complex Tours

Take a 30-minute tour through the galleries of the Hawaiian Hall Complex, guided by our Culture Education staff or trained docent volunteers. Choose the Overview Tour to be shown highlights in Hawaiian Hall and Pacific Hall, or create a Custom Tour that will include the galleries of your choosing.

There are currently no tours offered to Pre-K groups. Please check out our Culture Program!

Overview Tour

This 30-minute tour will be divided between Hawaiian Hall, which is focused on the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands, and Pacific Hall, which looks at all the many Pacific islands and the cultural ties that bind them together.  In each gallery, your guide will highlight key collections and stories.

Custom Tour

This 30-minute guided tour will include your choice of galleries in the Hawaiian Hall Complex.  With the guidance of Culture Education staff and trained docent volunteers, students will have the opportunity to explore a wide of range of topics related to museum collections currently on display.  Options include: Hawaiian Hall, Pacific Hall, the Kāhili Room, and the Picture Gallery. Depending on the timing of your visit, it might also be possible to include a special exhibit featured in the J. M. Long Gallery. Tours can spend 30 minutes in a single gallery, or divide that time between any number of galleries you select.

Gallery Spaces within the Hawaiian Hall Complex you can visit include:

Hawaiian Hall

The three floors of Hawaiian Hall take visitors on a journey through the different realms of Hawai‘i.
The first floor is the realm of Kai Ākea which represents the Hawaiian gods, legends, beliefs, and the world of pre-contact Hawai‘i.
The second floor, Wao Kanaka, represents the realm where people live and work; focusing on the importance of the land and nature in daily life.
The third floor, Wao Lani, is the realm inhabited by the gods; here, visitors will learn about the ali‘i and key moments in Hawaiian history.

Pacific Hall

Explore Moananuiākea, the wide expanse of Oceania, in Pacific Hall’s newly renovated two-story gallery.
Encounter the family of the Pacific on the first floor, which is filled with cultural treasures – model canoes, woven mats, contemporary artwork, and videos of Pacific scholars.
On the second floor, learn about the origins and migrations of Pacific peoples through the fields of archaeology, oral traditions, and linguistics.
Learn how the peoples of Oceania are diverse, yet deeply connected.

Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room

The Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room honors cherished ali‘i and displays the precious Kāhili (feather standards) associated with them.
On display here are portraits of the Hawaiian Monarchy and some of their personal
effects.

Long Gallery Special Exhibit

Click here to see what is currently on exhibit in the Long Gallery. The Long Gallery may or may not be available during the time of your visit.

HANA WA’A:  Canoe Design and Construction

Venture into canoe design and construction in Hawai’i and the Pacific as we explore both time-honored tradition and contemporary innovation in this living cultural practice.  This 30-minute tour will take students through specific displays in Hawaiian Hall and Pacific Hall, as well as Bishop Museum’s original exhibit, Holo Moana:  Generations of Voyaging*, in the Joseph M. Long Gallery. This tour is part of our Voyages of Discovery package, but can be booked as a standalone tour as well.

*Please note that Holo Moana:  Generations of Voyaging will be on exhibit beginning on November 4, 2017 and will close on June 24, 2018.

Overview Tour

This 30-minute tour will be divided between Hawaiian Hall, which is focused on the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands, and Pacific Hall, which looks at all the many Pacific islands and the cultural ties that bind them together.  In each gallery, your guide will highlight key collections and stories.

Custom Tour

This 30-minute guided tour will include your choice of galleries in the Hawaiian Hall Complex.  With the guidance of Culture Education staff and trained docent volunteers, students will have the opportunity to explore a wide of range of topics related to museum collections currently on display.  Options include: Hawaiian Hall, Pacific Hall, the Kāhili Room, and the Picture Gallery. Depending on the timing of your visit, it might also be possible to include a special exhibit featured in the J. M. Long Gallery. Tours can spend 30 minutes in a single gallery, or divide that time between any number of galleries you select.

Gallery Spaces within the Hawaiian Hall Complex you can visit include:

Hawaiian Hall

The three floors of Hawaiian Hall take visitors on a journey through the different realms of Hawai‘i.
The first floor is the realm of Kai Ākea which represents the Hawaiian gods, legends, beliefs, and the world of pre-contact Hawai‘i.
The second floor, Wao Kanaka, represents the realm where people live and work; focusing on the importance of the land and nature in daily life.
The third floor, Wao Lani, is the realm inhabited by the gods; here, visitors will learn about the ali‘i and key moments in Hawaiian history.

Pacific Hall

Explore Moananuiākea, the wide expanse of Oceania, in Pacific Hall’s newly renovated two-story gallery.
Encounter the family of the Pacific on the first floor, which is filled with cultural treasures – model canoes, woven mats, contemporary artwork, and videos of Pacific scholars.
On the second floor, learn about the origins and migrations of Pacific peoples through the fields of archaeology, oral traditions, and linguistics.
Learn how the peoples of Oceania are diverse, yet deeply connected.

Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room

The Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room honors cherished ali‘i and displays the precious Kāhili (feather standards) associated with them.
On display here are portraits of the Hawaiian Monarchy and some of their personal
effects.

Long Gallery Special Exhibit

Click here to see what is currently on exhibit in the Long Gallery. The Long Gallery may or may not be available during the time of your visit.

Overview Tour

This 30-minute tour will be divided between Hawaiian Hall, which is focused on the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands, and Pacific Hall, which looks at all the many Pacific islands and the cultural ties that bind them together.  In each gallery, your guide will highlight key collections and stories.

Custom Tour

This 30-minute guided tour will include your choice of galleries in the Hawaiian Hall Complex.  With the guidance of Culture Education staff and trained docent volunteers, students will have the opportunity to explore a wide of range of topics related to museum collections currently on display.  Options include: Hawaiian Hall, Pacific Hall, the Kāhili Room, and the Picture Gallery. Depending on the timing of your visit, it might also be possible to include a special exhibit featured in the J. M. Long Gallery. Tours can spend 30 minutes in a single gallery, or divide that time between any number of galleries you select.

Gallery Spaces within the Hawaiian Hall Complex you can visit include:

Hawaiian Hall

The three floors of Hawaiian Hall take visitors on a journey through the different realms of Hawai‘i.
The first floor is the realm of Kai Ākea which represents the Hawaiian gods, legends, beliefs, and the world of pre-contact Hawai‘i.
The second floor, Wao Kanaka, represents the realm where people live and work; focusing on the importance of the land and nature in daily life.
The third floor, Wao Lani, is the realm inhabited by the gods; here, visitors will learn about the ali‘i and key moments in Hawaiian history.

Pacific Hall

Explore Moananuiākea, the wide expanse of Oceania, in Pacific Hall’s newly renovated two-story gallery.
Encounter the family of the Pacific on the first floor, which is filled with cultural treasures – model canoes, woven mats, contemporary artwork, and videos of Pacific scholars.
On the second floor, learn about the origins and migrations of Pacific peoples through the fields of archaeology, oral traditions, and linguistics.
Learn how the peoples of Oceania are diverse, yet deeply connected.

Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room

The Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room honors cherished ali‘i and displays the precious Kāhili (feather standards) associated with them.
On display here are portraits of the Hawaiian Monarchy and some of their personal
effects.

Long Gallery Special Exhibit

Click here to see what is currently on exhibit in the Long Gallery. The Long Gallery may or may not be available during the time of your visit.

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