Educational Programs

Educational Programs Complete Listing

This page contains the comprehensive list of school-aged educational programs and targeted grade levels. While we encourage you to select recommended programs from the “Pick Two” package menus, you may select any combination of these offerings.

Please note that, if you elect to select a program above or below your grade level(s), program content may not be scaled as well for your groups’ learning needs.

ALL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (listed Alphabetically)

How do we live together on an island? Will we have all the things we need? Learn about the traditional Hawaiian system of land division, and how we can share resources from mauka to makai. Working together in an imaginative activity, students will explore the traditional Hawaiian tools that help us meet our basic human needs as individuals and as a community.

HCSSS Anchor Standards

  • SS.1.2.14.3 Investigate cultural and environmental characteristics of your community
  • SS.1.4.10.2 Identify different ways of acquiring what you need and want
  • SS.1.3.17.3 Compare life in the past to life today
  • SS.2.2.14.1 Explain how human activities impact the environment
  • SS.3.3.13.1 Analyze how geographical features affect human life in local communities and those around the world
  • SS.3.3.14.4 Analyze how cultural practices create and influence communities
  • SS.4.3.10.1 Analyze how early Hawaiians used natural resources to meet their needs
  • SS.4.7.10.2 Analyze how specialization of labor and the exchange of goods and services created a successful interdependent society in the ahupua‘a
  • SS.4.6.8.1 Explain how the kapu system regulated people’s behavior and lives
  • SS.4.6.9.2 Analyze how the kapu system maintained natural resources
  • SS.7PI.1.14.2 Explain how early Pacific people adapted to and modified environments on low and high islands

Watch the sphere get transformed into a giant cell so that students can easily identify the component parts of plant and animal cells.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.7.4.2 Describe the basic structure and function of various types of cells.
SC.7.4.3 Describe the levels of organization in organisms (cell, tissue, organ, organ system, whole organism).

Looking around our environment one can notice the wide variety of plants and animals that exist in the Hawaiian Islands.  This diversity grew over time developing in many cases from one distinct species.  The expansion into different types of subspecies is no accident; but in fact nature’s way of adapting to its environment.  This program explores how one species of bird (a finch) adapted to a new environment (Hawaii) and gave birth to a wide range of subspecies (honeycreepers).

HCPS III – Benchmarks
Science:
SC.BS.5.2 Explain the theory of natural selection.Performance Assessment- Describes the theory of natural selection and gives examples of how it accounts for the diversity and unity of past and present life forms (e.g., Darwin’s finches, snails, Nene, lobelia, silverswords, honeycreepers).
SC.BS.5.3 Explain the structural properties of DNA and the role of DNA in heredity and protein synthesis. Performance Assessment- Diagrams and explains the role of DNA in heredity and protein synthesis (e.g., DNA replication, translation, transcription, mRNA, codons).

One of these things is not like the others; one of these things just doesn’t belong! Students classify specimens embedded in resin to identify the similarities and differences between plants and animals.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
Science:
K.1.1 Use the senses to make observations.
K.1.3 Collect data about living and non-living things.
K.3.1 Identify similarities and differences between plants and animals.

What better way to learn about maps and globes than by using a 6-foot animated sphere? In this lively program, students will find their way around the globe using map symbols, co-ordinates, and cardinal directions.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SS.2.7.2 Describe the purpose and features of maps and globes.
MA.2.8.1 Use cardinal directions that describe the location of an object or place on a co-ordinate map.

Take a tour of the solar system to discover what causes day and night, how the moon moves around the earth and characteristics about the planets.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.5.8.1 Describe the relationship (size and distance) of the earth and other components of the solar system.
SC.5.8.3 Explain that the planets orbit the sun and that the moon orbits the earth.
SC.5.8.4 Demonstrate that day and night are caused by the rotation of the earth in its axis.

This new STEM program explores why Hawai‘i is a great place to learn about Earth system science and to discover how NASA satellites help us in our explorations of the planet.

HCPS III– Benchmarks
Science:
SC.3.2.1 Describe ways technologies in fields such as agriculture, information, manufacturing, or communication have influenced society.
SC.3.6.3 Explain how light traveling in a straight line changes when it reaches and object.
SC.3.8.3 Safely observe and describe the basic movements of the sun and moon.
SC.4.2.1 Describe how the use of technology has influenced the economy, demography, and environment of Hawai‘i.
SC.4.7.1 Describe that the mass of Earth exerts a gravitational force on all objects.
SC.4.8.1 Describe how slow processes sometimes ahape and reshape the surface of the Earth.
SC.4.8.2 Describe how fast processes (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes) sometimes ahape and reshape the surface of the Earth.
SC.4.8.3 Describe the relationship between the Sun and the Earth’s daily rotation and annual revolution.
SC.5.6.3 Compare what happens to light when it is reflected, refracted, and absorbed.
SC.5.8.1 Describe the relationship (size and distance) of Earth to other components of the solar system.
SC.5.8.3 Explain that the planets orbit the Sun and the moon orbits the Earth.
SC.5.8.4 Demonstrate that day and night are caused by the rotation of the Earth on its axis

Take a journey on a time machine and explore the Earth millions of years ago. Witness the movement of the continents, the birth and evolution of the Hawaiian Islands, and the active rumblings of earth today.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.4.8.1 Describe how slow processes sometimes shape and reshape the surface of the Earth.
SC.4.8.2 Describe how fast processes (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes) sometimes shape and reshape the surface of the Earth.

The three floors of Hawaiian Hall take visitors on a journey through the different realms of Hawai‘i. The first floor is the realm of Kai Ākea, which represents the Hawaiian gods, legends, beliefs, and the world of pre-contact Hawai‘i. The second floor, Wao Kanaka, represents the realm where people live and work; focusing on the importance of the land and nature in daily life. The third floor, Wao Lani, is the realm inhabited by the gods, and visitors can learn about ali‘i (chiefs) and critical moments in Hawaiʻi’s history.

Explore Moananuiākea, the wide expanse of Oceania, in Pacific Hall’s newly renovated two-story gallery. See cultural treasures representing community roles, chiefly authority, and pan-Pacific voyaging on the first floor; model canoes, woven mats, contemporary artwork, and videos of Pacific scholars provide visitors with context for the past, present, and future of Pacific Island peoples. On the second floor, learn about the origins and migrations of Pacific peoples through the fields of archaeology, oral traditions, and linguistics. Learn how the peoples of Oceania are diverse, yet deeply connected.

The Abigail Kinoiki Kekaulike Kāhili Room honors cherished ali‘i of the Hawaiian Monarchy and displays some of the precious kāhili (feather standards) associated with them. Also on display in the Kāhili Room are personal effects and intimate portraits of ruling chiefs and chiefesses, helping visitors to connect to their lives and the choices they made as leaders of the Kingdom of Hawaiʻi.

Learn about current exhibits in the Bishop Museum’s Joseph M. Long Gallery, located on the first floor of the Hawaiian Hall Complex. Please note that exhibits in this space rotate every six to eight months during the year, and opening and closing dates are subject to change.

This 25-minute tour takes visitors through Hawaiian Hall, focusing on the culture and history of the Hawaiian Islands, and Pacific Hall, which looks at the cultural ties that join the many island cultures of the Pacific Ocean together. In each gallery, your guide will highlight key collection objects, overarching themes, and illustrative stories.

“Watch the Big Volcano Grow,” as you join in this interactive program about Hawaiian volcanoes. Young children will be captivated through body movement, building, counting and singing.

Have fun learning about how the sun makes light and heat and why that is important for us living here on Earth!

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.1.8.1: Describe that the sun warms the land, air, and water.

Students engage in hands-on activities that test the ways in which the original flora and fauna made their way to the Hawaiian Islands. Have your class raft snails, blow insects, attach seeds and find out which species came to Hawai‘i in the stomach of a bird! Through their experiments they collect data to answer the question “How did it get here?”

HCPS III – Benchmarks
Science:
3.1.2 Safely collect and analyze data to answer a question.
3.3.1 Describe how plants depend on animals.
3.4.1 Compare distinct structures of living things that help them to survive

How do we travel across land and sea? Explore different styles of travel in Hawaiʻi and the Pacific. Our journey will take us through historic voyaging periods up to the present-day voyaging movement. Students will work together as a team of “canoe builders” to construct a model waʻa (canoe), and imagine life as a crew of ocean travelers.

HCSSS Anchor Standards

  • SS.1.3.17.3 Compare life in the past to life today
  • SS.2.3.14.5 Compare a variety of the Earth’s natural resources and how people use them
  • SS.3.3.15.2 Investigate factors that influence why people migrate and where they settle
  • SS.4.1.15.3 Explain how voyaging skills and canoe design allowed Polynesians to travel from Asia throughout the Pacific to Hawaiʻi
  • SS.4.2.14.3 Describe how the original settlers modified their environment
  • SS.4.1.18.2 Summarize migration stories passed down through Hawaiian oral tradition
  • SS.4.2.13.1 Identify major geographic characteristics of the Hawaiian archipelago, including its relative location to other major land masses
  • SS.7PI.1.13.1 Use geographic representations to explain the relationships between the origins, settlement, and languages of Pacific people

How do plants provide resources to meet our basic needs? Why do human beings take plants from one place to another? Expand your knowledge of the plants found here in Hawaiʻi and elsewhere in the Pacific and  why they were important to our voyaging ancestors. This 25-minute program highlights Pacific Island canoe plants and farming practices, and includes time in our native ethnobotanical garden.

HCSSS Anchor Standards

  • SS.1.2.14.3 Investigate cultural and environmental characteristics of your community
  • SS.1.4.10.2 Identify different ways of acquiring what you need and want
  • SS.1.3.17.3 Compare life in the past to life today
  • SS.2.3.14.5 Compare a variety of the Earth’s natural resources and how people use them
  • SS.3.3.15.2 Investigate factors that influence why people migrate and where they settle
  • SS.4.3.15.2 Differentiate between native and non-native plants and animals used by early Hawaiians

Learn about the unique plants and animals of Hawaiʻi through this joyful, interactive program. Students will have a chance to practice hula and mele, focusing on the special environments of our islands, in this 25-minute program, designed for younger learners in prekindergarten and kindergarten settings.

Boldly go where no preschooler has gone before.  Through games and songs, search for objects found in our day and night sky

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.K.8.2 Identify different types of celestial objects seen in the day and night sky.
MA.K.5.1 Identify common geometric shapes

MA.K.11.1 Sort objects or people according to stated attributes

How do we live together on our island home? Where do we find the resources we need, and how can we best utilize them? Learn about the ways in which unique natural resources and specialized tools can help us to meet our basic needs as people and the goals of our community in this 25-minute interactive program.

HCSSS Anchor Standards

  • SS.1.2.14.3 Investigate cultural and environmental characteristics of your community
  • SS.1.4.10.2 Identify different ways of acquiring what you need and want
  • SS.1.2.9.1 Explain how scarcity is a result of limited resources
  • SS.1.2.8.5 Explain how people improve their communities and the environment
  • SS.1.3.17.3 Compare life in the past to life today
  • SS.1.4.19.3 Explain causes and effects of an event in your life or in your family’s life
  • SS.2.2.14.1 Explain how human activities impact the environment
  • SS.2.3.12.2 Examine how people are dependent on others for goods and services they cannot produce themselves
  • SS.2.3.14.5 Compare a variety of the Earth’s natural resources and how people use them
  • SS.2.4.16.2 Investigate how people in your community rely on local and global resources to meet their daily needs
  • SS.2.4.8.3 Develop logical solutions to various community problems
  • SS.3.3.14.4 Analyze how cultural practices create and influence communities
  • SS.3.4.9.1 Compare ways that people are addressing the issue of limited natural resources
  • SS.4.2.14.3 Describe how the original settlers modified their environment
  • SS.4.3.10.1 Analyze how early Hawaiians used natural resources to meet their needs
  • SS.4.4.16.1 Compare aspects of early Hawaiian culture and other Polynesian cultures
  • SS.4.7.10.2 Analyze how specialization of labor and the exchange of goods and services created a successful interdependent society in the ahupua‘a
  • SS.4.8.8.1 Explain the roles and responsibilities of the aliʻi in governing Hawaiian society
  • SS.4.6.9.2 Analyze how the kapu system maintained natural resources
  • SS.7PI.1.14.2 Explain how early Pacific people adapted to and modified environments on low and high islands

Let’s have some fun! Students will learn about traditional Hawaiian games like hū (spinning tops), moa pāheʻe (sliding darts), and ʻulu maika (rolling game). Together, students will explore physical coordination, critical thinking and strategy, and team spirit in this challenging and fun 25-minute experience.

HCSSS Anchor Standards

  • SS.1.2.8.5 Explain how people improve their communities and the environment
  • SS.1.3.17.3 Compare life in the past to life today
  • SS.3.3.14.4 Analyze how cultural practices create and influence communities
  • SS.3.1.8.1 Explore how people can change rules and laws, and how these changes affect society
  • SS.4.3.10.1 Analyze how early Hawaiians used natural resources to meet their needs
  • SS.4.6.8.1 Explain how the kapu system regulated people’s behavior and lives
  • SS.4.6.9.2 Analyze how the kapu system maintained natural resources

When traveling to far off islands, how did the crew of a voyaging canoe know they were near land?  This 25 minutes hands-on program provides experience in how looking for clues in the wind, waves, and wings can help to navigate you toward your island destination. This program is part of our Voyages of Discovery package but can be booked as a standalone program.

To coincide with the Journeys: Heritage of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands exhibit take your class on an interactive adventure to the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI).  Discover what marine debris is, where it comes from and how it affects the turtles, birds and marine life in the NWHI through storytelling, puppets and hands-on activities. Examine real marine debris and bird boluses from the NWHI, and then identify ways you can help solve the marine debris problem.

Experience the life stages of a volcanic island, through a dramatic interactive multimedia presentation. Students will travel back in time to understand how the Hawaiian Islands grow and mature.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
Science:
4.8.1 Describe how slow processes sometimes shape and reshape the surface of the earth.
4.8.3 Describe how fast processes (e.g., volcanoes, earthquakes) sometimes shape and reshape the surface of the earth.

See the global effects of earthquakes and other disturbances on the world’s oceans. Learn about the role Hawai‘i’s scientists play in monitoring tsunamis around the world.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.6.2.1 Explain how technology has an impact on society and science.
SC.6.6.10 Explain that vibrations in materials set up wavelike disturbances that spread away from the source.

In this classroom version of Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, students will participate in an exciting game show as they learn about the rock cycle, plate tectonics, and the geology of Hawai‘i.

HCPS III – Benchmarks
Science:
SC.8.8.1 Compare the characteristics of the three main types of rock.
SC.8.8.2 Illustrate the rock cycle and explain how igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks are formed.
SC.ES.8.5 Explain the effects of movements of crustal plates.
SC.8.8.5 Explain the concepts of continental drift and plate tectonics.

Uncover how the water cycle affects the weather on Earth. Explore how the water cycle affects EXTREME weather events. Through our journey discover how we humans can clean up our ‘water act’ and help with water conservation today!

HCPS III – Benchmarks
SC.3.8.2: Describe how the water cycle is related to weather and climate.
SS.3.7.4: Examine the ways in which people modify the physical environment and the affects of these changes.

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