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Kapaemahu Speaker Series | Mauliola no nā hanauna

Thursday, August 4, 2022
6 – 7:30 p.m.
Atherton Hālau & Livestreamed via Zoom
Free admission

To register for the in-person event click the orange in-person registration button.
The conversation will be livestreamed on Youtube Live. To tune in virtually, please click the below link at the start of the event.

This program is part of a five-part speaker series that harnesses community discourse around The Healer of Stones of Kapaemahu exhibition on view in Bishop Museum’s Castle Memorial Building through Oct, 16, 2022. By bringing together cultural practitioners, scholars, artists, and community organizers, the program aims to cultivate deeper understanding of the exhibition’s central themes of gender diversity, Native Hawaiian health, and the power of monuments. These talks will take place in person at Bishop Museum’s Atherton Hālau and will be streamed live for virtual participation.

Join us for a panel featuring traditional healers as they discuss the groundbreaking approaches that helped establish new ways of addressing the self-determination of a marginalized people through the means of traditional healing practices.

Theme: Mauliola no nā hanauna / Health through the source of life for the generations 

The title of our presentation was given to us by our youngest presenter, Hiʻikapu Lima. It was with the intent of setting a vision as we all strive to carry on, heal, practice and live our traditions of well-being, not just for us but for generations past, present, a mau loa aku. Speakers include:  

Moderator: Dr. Landon Opunui
Haku Hoʻoponopono: Kuʻumeaaloha Gomes
Kanaka Lomilomi: HiʻikapuoKaholokahiki Kamāla`ehuaiKalama`ula Helm Lima
ʻAi Kūpele: Sharon Ka‘iulani Odom  
Kumu Lapaʻau: Keola Kawaiʻulaʻiliahi Chan  

The Kapaemahu Program Series is generously supported by McInerny Foundation, Bank of Hawaii, Trustee.

Event cover Image credit:
Courtesy of “The Healer Stones of Kapaemahu”

Speaker Bios 

Moderator: Dr. Landon Opunui
As a Native Hawaiian, Dr. Opunui functions as a naturopathic physician that weaves the traditional views of Hawaiian health with the scientific understanding of plants and the human body by integrating traditional, natural and modern medicine to restore health. Dr. Opunui is the medical director of Nā Puʻuwai and is the first naturopathic physician in history to be appointed medical director of a federally funded Native Hawaiian Health Care System where his team has designed an innovative Native Hawaiian Integrative Health Center that provides culturally responsive, interdisciplinary health services, programs and resources to the rural island communities of Molokaʻi and Lānaʻi. Practicing what he preaches and teaches, Dr. Opunui leads by example, modeling mauli ola (health and wellbeing) to his ʻohana (family), staff, patients and community. Dr. Opunui is also an adjunct professor at Chaminade University and serves as board member of the Traditional Hawaiian healing non-profit, Hui Mauli Ola.  

Haku Hoʻoponopono: Kuʻumeaaloha Gomes
When I was born my Tūtūwahine Loke Kanuha Kumuhone, gifted me with the inoa that would determine my lifeʻs work of healing. “Kuʻumeaaloha”, she said to my mākuahine, “Hers will be a life of healing”. At the age of 5 years old, I was introduced too Ho’oponopono by my Tītūwahine, who herself was a practitioner and Haku Hoʻoponopono and la’au lapa’au. Sitting, quietly on the floor, and listening, and watching her kōkua others to talk about the pilikia, look closely at the ʻehā, to kala and mihi, and restore pono in the ʻohana, I grew up being that child who talked with Akua, helped soothe friends ēhā, and even listened to adults venting. These early experiences, the inoa kūleana, and Tūtūʻs prediction, shaped my education and career choices. Mentors ‘Anake Lynette and Anakala Likeke Paglinawan, Earl Kāwaʻa, and many others, and the ʻaina Kāhoʻolawe and Keʻolonāhīhī, anchored me in mauli ola. Today, with the ʻauamō kūleana for healing, through Ka Pā Kāhili Kaiāulu, with a commitment to put “A Healer in Every Home”, I continue to share this ʻike kūpuna with haumāna, and make myself available to ʻohana and other poʻe, to ho’oponopono where needed. 

Kanaka Lomilomi: HiʻikapuoKaholokahiki Kamāla`ehuaiKalama`ula Helm Lima
Comes from the Helm, Koko, Halualani, Lima, Kekahuna Kalaluhi, and Kanoa mo`okū`auhau inherited from his makua U`ilani Lima & Kekama Helm. He lives in Kualapu`u and was raised on Molokai nui a Hina, from the shores of Halawa, `Ahaino, Ka`amola, Kalamaula, Anahaki, Mo`omomi, and Pohaku Mauliuli.  He is a keiki in Papa Mo`olapa`au of Ka Pā o Lonopūhā.  

ʻAi Kūpele: Sharon Ka‘iulani Odom
Kaiulani Odom has been involved in the area of native Hawaiian Health for the past 20 years.  She has developed educational media for print, television and screen.  Her specialty is in `Ai Kupele, nutrition from a cultural perspective.  Her work involves communities, schools, and most importantly families.  During the last 10 years, in an effort to expand her perspective on health, she has been immersed in the study of ho‘oponopono, lā‘au lapa‘au and lomilomi.  It is her goal to support native Hawaiian communities to connect with the `ike and practices passed down by their ancestors, fostering healthy lifestyles for future generations.  Kaiulani currently works for Kokua Kalihi Valley Health Center as the ROOTS program Director.  ROOTS goal is to bring community members together as a part of a larger social network.  Centering around food as a source of nourishment, identity, and connection, project activities build bonds between community members as they cultivate food and medicine, cook together, share traditional practices for food preparation, and eat together in common spaces. The concept of malama `äina (to care for the land) refers to a reciprocal relationship.  For the land to supply food and sustenance, we must in turn take care of it.  Teaching the community about the culture and wisdom of their ancestors provides a natural segue into education on nutrition and healthy living.  Appreciating your heritage is a healthy practice in itself…through honoring our culture and ancestors, we honor ourselves.  

Kumu Lapaʻau: Keola Kawaiʻulaʻiliahi Chan
Keola Chan is the Kumu Lapaʻau of Ka Pā o Lonopūhā, Academy of Native Hawaiian Healing Traditions. His vision is set upon establishing “A healer in every home.” He currently serves as the Executive Director of ʻAha Kāne Foundation for the Advancement of Native Hawaiian Males. The overarching goal of this organization is to “strengthen the Native Hawaiian community through nurturing and perpetuating the traditional male roles and responsibilities that contribute to the physical, mental, spiritual, and social well-being of Hawaiian males, their families, and communities.” Previously, Keola was a Research Analyst at the Office of Hawaiian Affairs where he worked towards the advancement of Native Hawaiians in the areas of Health and Education. He also founded Hui Mauli Ola, a non-profit organization that seeks to promote and improve the “health and well-being of our communities through empowering and providing access to quality care and educational opportunities.” In 2021, Keola was honored as the “Educator of the Year,” by the Native Hawaiian Education Association. As an entrepreneur Keola established Kamakanuiāhaʻilono LLC where he builds health based curriculum and programs statewide to provide access to families interested in becoming stewards of Mauli Ola. 

Date

Aug 04 2022

Time

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Atherton Hālau

Location

Atherton Hālau
Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum

Organizer

Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum
In Person Registration