Bishop Museum hosts lectures, panel discussions, storytelling and more but since not everybody can visit our campus, we’ll be sharing some of our on-site programming in a continuing series of podcasts.

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The Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum in Honolulu on the island of Oahu first opened its doors back in 1891. The museum is Hawaii’s preeminent place to discover and learn about Hawaii and Polynesia’s cultural past. There are also engaging, cool hands-on interactive experiences at the museum’s Science Adventure Center.

Join Bishop Museum’s revered historian, Desoto Brown as he talks-story about the museum’s past, present, and future with correspondent Tom Wilmer.

Mahalo to KXCB for use of this audio.

In a second podcast from KCBX Bishop Museum’s historian, DeSoto Brown discusses life in the Territory of Hawai‘i in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

TOTP: Expanding the Journey
Recorded Wednesday, September 7, 2016 in Hawaiian Hall
Bishop Museum’s Traditions of the Pacific Lecture Series

Evidence of the cultural and scientific significance of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument comes to life in this riveting special edition of Traditions of the Pacific: Expanding the Journey. 

Bishop Museum experts share their stories and experiences of research in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands:

Dr. Mara Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources will share about her recent expedition to Nihoa in the Monument and about the relevancy of her work the Museum’s cultural collections.

Dr. Norine Yeung, Malacology Researcher and IUCN WCC 2016 Speaker will speak about the role of the Museum in connecting people to nature through cultural heritage and research.

Dr. Richard Pyle, Associate Zoologist will speak about current breakthrough research and discoveries in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and reveal a new species of fish. Dr. Pyle will also touch on the recent headline news of President Obama’s expansion of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument.

TOTP: Sharing Our Waters
Recorded Thursday, August 18, 2016 in the Planet Shark exhibit, Castle Memorial Building
Bishop Museum’s Traditions of the Pacific Lecture Series

Hear exciting shark encounters from three amazing ocean conservationists who share the water with these amazing creatures. Moderated by Dr. Rich Pyle, Bishop Museum associate zoologist and researcher with special guests: 

– Kaiwi Berry founder of Island View Hawaiʻi, a pelagic dive tour company 
– Jennifer Cole, conservation coordinator at White Shark Africa,  white shark research, conservation, education and sightseeing tour programs 

The final installment of our three-part Traditions of the Pacific Lecture series on sharks.

Science and Ecology of Sharks with Shark Researcher Dr. Carl Meyer
Recorded on Thursday, July 21, 2016 in Atherton Hālau
Bishop Museum’s Traditions of the Pacific Lecture Series

Dr. Carl Meyer’s research focuses on the ecology and management of sharks. He studies the movement patterns, habitat use and trophic ecology of sharks, and their navigational abilities. His research addresses a variety of issues of management concern including impacts of shark ecotourism, shark predation on critically endangered species, effectiveness of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and impacts of human recreational activities.

Part 2 of a three part Traditions of the Pacific Lecture series on sharks.

Manō Legends with Master Storyteller Lopaka Kapanui
Recorded June 16, 2016 in Hawaiian Hall
Bishop Museum’s Traditions of the Pacific Lecture Series

Shark ‘aumākua; are they the stuff of legend or are they real and do they exist today? Come hear these mo’olelo and more! This is just the first part of the stories he shared. Hear more from Lopaka Kapanui here.

Part 1 of a 3 part lecture series on sharks.

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Unearthing the Polynesian Past with Dr. Patrick V. Kirch
Recorded April 28, 2016
A Traditions of the Pacific Lecture in the Atherton Hālau

For more than half a century, Hawai’i-born and raised archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch has explored the Pacific, on expeditions that took him to a score of islands from the Bismarck Archipelago to Easter Island. As a Punahou student, he apprenticed with famed Bishop Museum archaeologist Kenneth Emory at digs on Hawai’i and Maui. In this retrospective talk, Kirch looks back over a half-century of Polynesian archaeology, reflecting on how the questions we ask about the past have changed over the decades, how archaeological methods have advanced, and how our knowledge of the Polynesian past has greatly expanded.

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Traditions & Insights in Native Hawaiian Child-Rearing Practices
Dr. Carol Titcomb, MD
Recorded on Thursday, May 21, 2015 in Atherton Hālau

Building on scholarship and knowledge of many sources including writings of Mary Kawena Pukui and discussions with Hawaiian elders, Dr. Carol Titcomb shares findings from her descriptive study about culturally-based child-rearing practices. Dr. Titcomb is a pediatrician who has practiced medicine in Wai‘anae, Waimānalo and Papakōlea. She conducted this study as part of a research fellowship at the University of Hawai‘i, School of Medicine’s Department of Native Hawaiian Health.

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Traditional Hawaiian Practices of Hāpai and Hānau
Kai‘ulani Odom and Emerson Kihei Nahale, Kōkua Kalihi Valley
Recorded Thursday, March 5, 2015 in Atherton Hālau

The progression from pre-gestation to birth encompasses an array of physical and metaphysical responsibilities to ensure a pathway of health for child, mother and family. Knowledgeable Native Hawaiian cultural and clinical practitioners will provide insightful perspectives about traditional approaches to pregnancy and child birth and how families can be empowered to incorporate cultural practices into the birthing experience.

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Nani I Ka Hala: A Weaver’s Perspective 
Recorded April 19, 2015
Originally broadcast on 94.7 KUMU
Mahalo to Ohana Broadcasting

Bishop Museum Cultural Research Specialist and master lau hala weaver Marques Hanalei Marzan talks with Diane Ako about the new exhibit, Nani I Ka Hala, open from March 28 to July 27, 2015 in the Bishop Museum’s Long Gallery. The exhibit explores the art, science, and cultural importance of the hala tree and showcases dozens of fine examples of this thriving art form.

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Kaʻohinani o Ke Kai: The Bounty of the Sea presented by Sig Zane
Recorded February 7, 2015
A Traditions of the Pacific Lecture in Hawaiian Hall

This Traditions of the Pacific event presented an evening of story, sharing, and aloha that explored the artistic, cultural, and biological expressions of limu and kūpe‘e with artists and cultural practitioners, Sig Zane, and his son, Kuha‘o Zane, from Keaukaha, Hilo, Island of Hawai‘i. Mahalo to the Queen’s Health Systems for their generous support.

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The Land of La’amaikahiki: Ancient Hawaiian Life in the Kua’āina of Kahikinui, Maui
presented by Patrick V. Kirch
Recorded May 2, 2014
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in Hawaiian Hall

Kahikinui, on the southeastern slopes of Maui’s Haleakalā, remains one of the last places in the Hawaiian Islands where the landscape of an entire moku is preserved intact. Based on seventeen years of archaeological field research, Prof. Patrick Kirch tells the story of this ‘āina malo’o, part of the greatest continuous zone of dryland planting in the archipelago. Based on his studies of thousands of house sites, heiau, and other vestiges of ancient life, Kirch traces the history of Kahikinui from the first arrival of Polynesians in the eleventh century A.D. to the final abandonment of the land at the end of the nineteenth century.

 

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Kaulana Mahina presented by Kalei Nu’uhiwa
Recorded April 16, 2014
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in Hawaiian Hall

Observing the sky phenomena is the realm of the kilolani in the discipline of Papahulilani–clouds, winds, sun, stars and moon are among the prominent foci of this discipline. In the traditional Hawaiian world view, these atmospheric elements embody the pantheon of kino akua Hawai’i, and provide a fundamental function in ancestral memory still essential in the modern Hawaiian consciousness. The behavior of these members of the heavenly realm can be tracked across the cycles of day and night, the waxing and waning of the moon, and the procession of the sun in its seasonal arcs over the year. Learning the roughly 30 day moon cycle and the connection of these to the behavior of everything in the living universe around us is the topic of Kalei Nu’uhiwa’s presentation, Kaulana Mahina.

125 Years of Bishop Museum: Reflection Through Print
A Traditions of the Pacific Lecture in the Atherton Hālau
March 20, 2014

In commemoration of our 125th anniversary, Bishop Museum invited our historian, DeSoto Brown, to present an evening lecture of history intertwined with historical photography and vintage prints on March 20th, 2014. In a reflective look back at the last 125 years of our evolution, visitors were presented with iconic imagery, observational anecdotes, and rarely shared stories from the treasure trove that is our Library & Archives collection. DeSoto led the audience down Bishop Museum’s and Hawai’i’s memory lane in an engaging look back at the highlights, periods of adversity, and profound moments in our island’s history with gorgeous photography and prints directly from our Library & Archives collection.

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Kukulu Hale Kahiko presented by Kumu Francis “Palani” Sinenci
Recorded February 20, 2014
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Kukulu Hale Kahiko is the traditional method of building the Hawaiian house. RenownedKuhikuhipu’uone (Master Architect) Francis “Palani” Sinenci of Hale Kuhikuhi gives an insightful and engaging presentation that details the methods of kukulu hale (building house). In addition, Kumu Palani highlights stories of the revival and reinvigoration of related protocols that contribute important elements to this traditional art.

 

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Wao Kanaka: The Hawaiian Pre-contact Ecological Footprint
presented by Dr. Sam ‘Ohu Gon
Recorded January 30, 2014
a Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Listen to Dr. Sam ‘Ohu Gon, senior scientist and cultural advisor at The Nature Conservancy of Hawai’i, give a thought-provoking lecture on the “footprint” left by the historical Hawaiian culture and its lasting mark on the Islands’ ecosystems. Using archeological modeling and traditional knowledge sources including mo’olelo andoli, he reconstructs the pre-contact Hawaiian world as a series of maps, which unfold the story of the changing islandlandscapes that culminate in the world today.

 

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Lei Ni‘ihau: Forbidden Island Treasures
HPR’s Noe Tanigawa reports on an exhibition of exquisite Ni’ihau shell lei on view now at the Bishop Museum.

 

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Voyagers of the Sky presented by Robert Shallenberger, Ph.D.
Recorded December 12, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Listen to renowned conservation biologist and wildlife photographer, Dr. Robert Shallenberger, give an illuminating talk on our fine feathered friends and voyagers of the Hawaiian skies. Two dozen seabird species call Hawai’i home, while ranging widely across the Pacific Ocean and beyond. These birds are finely adapted to their terrestrial, aquatic and aerial environments. This lecture focuses on their natural history and their complex cultural connection with the people who share their home. 

 

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Another Legacy of Hawai’i’s Voyaging Chiefs: Models of Successful Leadership
presented by Kēhaunani Abad, Ph.D.
Recorded November 14, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture Atherton Hālau

What might today’s Hawaiian community leaders share in common with Hawai’i’s legendary chiefs? Many aspects of what are considered to be foundational Hawaiian leadership traits stem from the era of voyaging chiefs. Learn how historic circumstances shaped social interactions of leaders past and established successful models of behavior that were emulated in later generations of ali’i. Dr. Abad gives a captivating look into those lessons learned, and how they remain as relevant today as they were long ago.

 

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Hawaiian Fish Hooks: Then and Now presented by G. Umi Kai
Recorded October 17, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Master Weapon Maker and Hawaiian Artisan, G. Umi Kai, gives an interesting look into the design, materials, and functions of the kahiko makau (ornamental fish hook). In addition, Umi explores how the Hawaiian ancestors crafted their makau in the past, and what tools were used to create the exquisite, cultural objects. By tracing from the past purposes and methods to the designs of today, the role of makau as a functional tool to wearable art is better understood.

 

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The Whare Tapere presented by Jack Gray
Recorded September 12, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Jack Gray gives a short presentation on the Whare Tapere – Pre-European Pa (Māori village) based houses of entertainment, storytelling and dance. The Whare Tapere fell into disuse during the 19th Century as Māori moved away to larger towns and cities resulting in the loss of these particular forms. Since 2004, an innovative cultural research process by Charles Royal and Orotokare has sought to reimagine these particular arts based on fragments of knowledge that remained, leading to the development and performance of a modern Whare Tapere.

 

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The Settlement of the Pacific and Hawaiian Origins
presented by Patrick V. Kirch, PhD.

Recorded September 21, 2013
Part of the Grand Unveiling of Pacific Hall
in the Castle Memorial Building

Professor Patrick V. Kirch is a foremost expert in the field of Pacific Archaeology. He has carried out archaeological research across the Pacific and his research expertise includes the Lapita expansion, Polynesian origins and settlement, and the development of agricultural intensification and socio-political systems in Oceania. In this lecture, Professor Kirch outlines the current understanding regarding the settlement of the Pacific and Hawaiian origins, which is also the topic of his recent book entitled A Shark Going Inland is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawai’i.

 

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A Society that Self-Destructed? Recent Archaeological Research on Rapa Nui
presented by Mara Mulrooney, Ph.D.
Recorded August 29, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

Rapa Nui (Easter Island) is often portrayed as the locale of a dramatic societal collapse triggered by overpopulation and environmental degradation during the late pre-European contact period (before A.D. 1722). Despite the popularity of this collapse narrative, there is very little solid evidence for it. In this presentation, Dr. Mulrooney shares the results of recent archaeological research into settlement and land use on the island.

 

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Distinguishing between fact and fiction on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)

Dr. Mulrooney is an Assistant Anthropologist at the Bishop Museum. In an interview with Hawaii Public Radio’s Chris Vandercook, Dr. Mulrooney talks about her archaeological work on Rapa Nui that uncovers evidence about what Rapanui society was like before the first Europeans visited the island on Easter Sunday in 1722.

Mahalo to Hawai’i Public Radio for sharing this audio content with us.

 

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Bishop Museum’s Pacific Hall renovation is the topic of Hawaii Public Radio’s Business of the Arts show with Host Judy Neal. Listen to exhibit team members Historian DeSoto Brown, Project Manager Elizabeth Tatar and Exhibit Designer Dave Kemble talk about how they will present a new perspective on the story of Pacific migration through a multiple of avenues that show how cultures of the Pacific are still alive and functioning today. Pacific Hall will re-open on September 21, 2013.

Mahalo to Hawai’i Public Radio for sharing this audio content with us.

 

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A Young Man and the Stars – Nainoa Thompson presented by Sam Low, Ph.D.
Recorded May 30, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture
Atherton Hālau

Author and producer, Sam Low, Ph.D., gives an insighful lecture covering the traditional Polynesian voyaging techniques employed by the Polynesian Voyaging Society’s President and legendary captain, Nainoa Thompson. Sam’s new book Hawaiki Rising dwells into Nainoa’s process of learning an ancient way of navigating by a world of natural signs. Sam gives first-hand accounts and reads powerful excerpts from his book that complements the amazing life of a living legend.

 

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Bishop Museum zoologist Dr. Ken Longenecker was interviewed recently on Hawai’i Public Radio’s morning show The Conversation.

In case you missed it, we are happy to share it again.

He describes his ongoing work on the east coast of Papua New Guinea, working with native peoples to safegaurd biological resources. Ken and his team have made numerous trips to the Kamiali Biological Resource Station.

Mahalo to Hawai’i Public Radio for sharing this audio content with us.

 

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The Archaeology of Nihoa and Necker Islands:Towards a New Understanding for Hawaiian Pre-Contact History
presented by Dr. Kekuewa Kikiloi

Recorded May 16, 2013
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Atherton Hālau

It has been 90 years since Dr. Kenneth Emory of the Bishop Museum did his ground breaking early work on understanding the mysterious ruins located on the islands of Nihoa and Necker, remotely located to the northwest of the ‘main’ Hawaiian Islands. Dr. Kikiloi’s presentation covered the outcomes of a recent ten year dissertation research project (2002-2012) that sought to further understand the archaeology of these two islands and the context these settlements played in traditional Hawaiian society. It focuses on a period of the late expansion phase (A.D. 1400-1650), when formidable changes were underway in ritual and social organization that ultimately led to the emergence of Hawai‘i as a powerful complex chiefdom. This research demonstrates that over a four hundred year period these remote islands became the central focus of chiefly elites in establishing this area as a ritual center of power.

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Japanese Internment in Hawai‘i
Congressional Gold Medal Special Programming
Recorded April 6, 2013
Castle Memorial Building
Panel discussion
Panelists: Ryan Kawamoto, Jane Kuwahara, Brian Niiya, Bill Kaneko
Moderator: Carole Hayashino

In this podcast the panel retraces the little known story of the internment of Japanese-Americans in Hawai`i during World War II and the decades-long struggle for legislative redress.

 

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MIS Veterans Talk Story: The Military Intelligence Service, WWII, and Kaua‘i
Congressional Gold Medal Special Programming
Presented April 14, 2013
Castle Memorial Building
Speakers: Jimmy Kuroiwa, George Arine, Yoshinobu Oshiro, George Shiroma

Veterans from Kaua’i tell of their military service in World War II and after to a visiting group of high school students from Kaua’i in Honolulu for a choral festival. Vets Yoshinobu Oshiro and George Shiroma share songs, stories, poems, and more with the students. Moderated by Jimmy Kuroiwa and George Arine.

 

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Commitment to Education – Panel Discussion
Congressional Gold Medal Special Programming
Presented April 13, 2013
in the Castle Memorial Building
Panelists: Joan Funamura, Charles Kagawa, May Price, Charlotte Unni
Moderator: Ann (Miyake) Mahi (pictured at left)
The story of the Nisei Veterans through the eyes of their children is a compelling legacy to the heroism of these men and how their values impacted the lives of their children. Educators from the Hawaii State Department of Education share their stories of what they learned from their fathers and uncles, the influence it had on their philosophy today and how it serves as an inspiration to future generations.

 

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Reconfiguring the Polynesian Triangle – Evidence of Polynesian Contacts with the Americas
Dr. Lisa Matisoo-Smith
A Traditions of the Pacific lecture in the Castle Memorial Building
Presented April 4, 2013
The Polynesian Triangle is generally defined by the apices of Hawai’i, Rapa Nui and Aotearoa/New Zealand. Evidence is accumulating, however, which indicates that Polynesians continued voyaging eastwards and made multiple contacts with the Americas. Dr. Matisoo-Smith’s talk focused on the latest archaeological, cultural, and biological and genetic data indicating the likely timing and location of Polynesian contacts in the Americas. Dr. Matisoo-Smith is a Professor of Biological Anthropology at the University of Otago in Dunedin, New Zealand. Her research focuses on the biological evidence for better understanding the prehistory of the Pacific.

 

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Okage Sama De: True stories of Hawai‘i Nisei experiences during World War II
presented by Alton Takiyama-Chung

in the Castle Memorial Building
Presented April 2, 2013

Nationally acclaimed storyteller Alton Takiyama-Chung presented true accounts of Nisei soldiers and their families during World War II. Underwritten by the Kazuo and Mary Yamane Family Foundation. This presentation was recorded as part of the exhibition American Heroes: WWII Nisei Soldiers and the Congressional Gold Medal.