Honolulu, HI – The Hawaiian Islands have long been thought to support just one endemic land mammal in its brief geologic history, the Hawaiian hoary bat. That has changed thanks to a study co-authored by three scientists – two of which have had extensive careers in research at Bishop Museum. New fossil evidence indicates that a second, very different species of bat lived alongside the hoary bat for thousands of years before going extinct shortly after humans arrived on the islands. The research, published this week in American Museum Novitates, was co-authored by Bishop Museum entomologist, Francis Howarth, the late Bishop Museum mammologist Alan Ziegler, and curator-in-charge of the American Museum of Natural History’s Department of Mammalogy Nancy Simmons. The research describes the mysterious bat, named Synemporion keana, whose remains were first discovered in a lava tube more than 30 years ago.

Neal Evenhuis, lead scientist with Bishop Museum commented on the remarkable discovery: “This finding is not only significant in that it shows we had a higher diversity of land mammals than was previously known, but also shows the significance of researching Hawai‘i’s lava tube fauna in giving us a glimpse into what was living in Hawai‘i thousands of years ago.”

Howarth was investigating lava tubes in Maui in 1981 when he discovered skeletal remains of the bat. He took the fossils to his colleague Ziegler, and later they and colleagues found remains on four other islands: Hawai‘i, Kaua‘i, Moloka‘i, and O‘ahu. “The initial specimens included skeletons imbedded in crystals on the lava tube wall and thus were likely very old,” Howarth said. “Ziegler eagerly guided me through the bat collection at the Bishop Museum to identify the bat and show me features to look for in order to find additional material for study.” Ziegler immediately recognized that the small bat was very different from anything else he had seen and started the long process of investigating where it sits in the tree of life. He died in 2003 and the project was put on hold until Simmons was brought in to continue the work.

“The Hawaiian Islands are a long way from anywhere, and as a result, they have a very unique fauna—its native animals apparently got there originally by flying or swimming,” said Simmons. “Besides the animals that humans have introduced to the islands, like rats and pigs, the only mammals that we’ve known to be native to Hawaii are a monk seal, which is primarily aquatic, and the hoary bat. So finding that there actually was a different bat — a second native land mammal for the islands — living there for such a long period of time was quite a surprise.”

The authors think that the extinction of Synemporion keana might have happened directly or indirectly because of human colonization of the islands and the invasive nonnative species that came with human explorers and settlers. “It seems possible that the reduction of native forests and associated insects after human colonization of the islands contributed not just to the extinction of plants, birds, and invertebrates, but also to the extinction of this endemic bat,” said Howarth.

Smaller than the hoary bat, Synemporion keana first appeared in the fossil record on the islands around 320,000 years ago and survived until at least 1,100 years ago—possibly much later. The two species of bats coexisted for several thousand years. Synemporion keana, which is a kind of vesper, or evening bat, had an array of features that so far have made it impossible for the researchers to identify its closest relatives. Simmons and Howarth hope that future work with ancient DNA extracted from the fossils might help them solve the mystery.

To read the research in American Museum Novitates, visit: http://digitallibrary.amnh.org/handle/2246/6641

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Bishop Museum was live.Friday, January 20th, 2017 at 12:01pm

Join us for a #ThrowBackThursday about #PlantationDays!

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Join us as we honor our founder, Charles Reed Bishop, with a special program in celebration of his birthday on Sunday, January 29, 2017, 12noon-1pm in Hawaiian Hall.

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Join us for a discussion of native and non-native plants and animals of Hawaiʻi with #TechTuesday's Michael Wilson!

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