November 2, 2016

Bishop Museum to hold special planetarium shows and host viewing of the brightest supermoon since 1948

On the evening of Nov. 13 through Nov. 14, star-gazers will be treated to the second “supermoon” of 2016 and the largest and brightest supermoon to occur in an 84-year stretch. Bishop Museum’s J. Watumull Planetarium will offer special programming related to this phenomenal lunar event on Nov. 13 along with an opportunity to view the moon through the museum’s telescopes.

The term supermoon refers to a full moon that occurs within one day of “perigee”—the moon’s closest approach to Earth in its monthly orbit. The Nov. 13-14 moon will be especially large because the full moon at 3:52 a.m. occurs just two and a half hours after the moon is nearest to Earth in its monthly orbit. At the moment of perigee at 1:23 a.m. on Nov. 14, the center of Earth and the center of the moon will be a mere 221,524 miles apart. This is 30,000 miles closer than when the moon is at its most distant point in orbit around Earth. The last supermoon this close to Earth occurred in 1948 and will not occur again until the year 2034, making this the closest full moon in an 84-year stretch. Bishop Museum will offer the following special programming:

What:             Supermoon at Bishop Museum’s J. Watumull Planetarium

Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016

Program:       The Moon Show – 6 p.m.

Live planetarium show exploring the lunar phases and what constitutes a supermoon.

Supermoon Viewing – 7-8 p.m.

Explore the supermoon and the night sky from Bishop Museum’s telescopes.

Laser Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon – 8 p.m.

The entire classic album about the moon, set to lasers.

Pricing:          The Moon Show or Laser Pink Floyd:

$10 general, $7 children 4-12, $5 for museum members

Discount for both shows:

$17 general, $12 children 4-12, $7 for museum members

Please note that in order to attend the 7-8 p.m. viewing, visitors must purchase tickets to either The Moon Show or Laser Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon. Reservations are highly recommended and can be made at http://www.bishopmuseum.org/planetarium/